Learn American History through 50 pop songs

My Bill Of Rights

Synopsis

The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments of the US Constitution. They are called the Bill of Rights because their goal as provided by the framers of the Constitution is to protect the basic rights of all American citizens.

Lyrics

© Copyright 2010 by Mr. and Mrs. Gillenwater

My 1st Amendment says I can say anything, I can say anything, anything I want
I can scream and I can shout, I can rant and rave about
I can rant and rave about anything I want

My 1st Amendment says I can worship anyone, I can worship anyone, anyone I want
Jesus Christ, Mohammed, Buddha, I can praise and I can pray to
I can praise and I can pray to anyone I want

I have a Bill of Rights, the first ten Amendments
I have a Bill of Rights… Amendments to the Constitution

My 1st Amendment says I can protest anytime, I can protest anytime, anytime I want
I can gather up some friends and demand an unjust war to end
Demand an unjust war to end, anytime I want

I have a Bill of Rights, the first ten Amendments
I have a Bill of Rights… Amendments to the Constitution

Number 2 let’s me bear arms and keep my family from harm
Number 3 says I don’t gotta quarter any Army soldier
Number 4 says cops need a warrant, I plead the 5th in the court
Number 6 says my trial must be speedy, and 7 says that I’ll have a jury
Number 8 says my punishment won’t be unusual or cruel
And the 9th and 10th Amendment protects the first eight rules

I have a Bill of Rights, the first ten Amendments
I have a Bill of Rights… Amendments to the Constitution

My 1st Amendment says I can write any words, I can write any words, any words I want
Disgruntled tirades to the paper and they can publish every letter
They can publish every letter of any words I want

I have a Bill of Rights, the first ten Amendments
I have a Bill of Rights… Amendments to the Constitution

Vocabulary

Bill of Rights— Adopted in 1792 they are the first ten amendments to the Constitution, which guarantee basic individual rights.

1st Amendment— The First Amendment to the United States Constitution is the part of the Bill of Rights that guarantees the free exercise of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, or the right to petition the government.

2nd Amendment— The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights that protects a right to keep and bear arms.

3rd Amendment— The Third Amendment to the United States Constitution is a part of the United States Bill of Rights that prohibits, in peacetime, the quartering (housing) of soldiers in private homes without the owner's consent.

4th Amendment— The Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution is the part of the Bill of Rights which guards against unreasonable searches and seizures.

5th Amendment— The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution protects against abuse of government authority in a legal procedure. Among other things, the Fifth Amendment protects witnesses from being forced to incriminate themselves. To "plead the Fifth" is to refuse to answer a question because the response could provide self-incriminating evidence of an illegal conduct punished by fines, penalties or forfeiture.

6th Amendment— The Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights which sets forth rights related to criminal prosecutions in federal courts. Among other things the Sixth Amendment guarantees defendants in criminal cases the right to a speedy trial.

7th Amendment— The Seventh Amendment of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, guarantees the right to a jury trial in certain civil trials.

8th Amendment— The Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution is the part of the United States Bill of Rights which prohibits the federal government from imposing excessive bail, excessive fines or cruel and unusual punishments.

9th Amendment— The Ninth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, addresses rights of the people that are not specifically enumerated in the Constitution.

10th Amendment— The Tenth Amendment of the United States Constitution is part of the Bill of Rights that restates the Constitution's principle of federalism by providing that powers not granted to the national government nor prohibited to the states are reserved to the states or the people.

Tiered Questions

Tier 1 Questions

How many amendments are in the Bill if Rights?

Name four protections the First Amendment gives US citizens.

Briefly explain how amendments 2-8 protect Americans.

Tier 2 Questions

Answer ALL Tier 1 Questions.

Look at the four rights guaranteed under the First Amendment. Do you see a relationship between them? Explain.

Do you think the First Amendment is sill an important part of the Constitution? Explain.

Tier 3 Questions

Answer ALL Tier 2 Questions.

While you and your family ate dinner one night a policeman broke down the door. He said he was looking for drugs. He never showed you a warrant. He found your gun, which was registered and stored safely. He also found a letter you had written to the President complaining about your taxes. He took both and arrested you. You were thrown into jail and told it could be years before you had a trial. Meanwhile 5 soldiers moved into your house. Your bail was set at 15 trillion dollars and you were routinely beaten and starved while in prison. When you were finally tried it was in a courtroom with one judge who never let you speak and found you guilty immediately. You spent the rest of you life in jail.

How many amendments were broken in the above story?

Test Prep Questions

1) The first amendment guarantee of freedom of speech was added to the United States Constitution primarily because its supporters believed it was essential to

  • (1) discourage criticism of government policies
  • (2) ensure the functioning of democracy
  • (3) limit political debate in Congress
  • (4) encourage more candidates to run for office

2) One similarity between the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights is that both documents

  • (1) provide for a government with three separate branches
  • (2) discuss colonial grievances against the monarchy
  • (3) stress the importance of individual liberty
  • (4) criticize the practice of slavery review?

“. . . Now, one of the most essential branches of English liberty is the freedom of one’s house. A man’s house is his castle; and whilst he is quiet, he is as well guarded as a prince in his castle. . . .”

—James Otis, Against the Writs of Assistance, 1761

3) Which provision in the Bill of Rights includes this same belief?

  • (1) right to a fair trial
  • (2) protection against unreasonable search and seizure
  • (3) guarantee against double jeopardy
  • (4) prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment

4) The due process clause in the 5th Amendment and the right to an attorney in the 6th Amendment were designed to

  • (1) protect freedom of expression
  • (2) assure that laws are properly enacted
  • (3) ensure fair treatment for those accused of crimes
  • (4) provide for judicial review of laws

5) “. . . no warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause . . . and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.

This section of the 4th Amendment to the United States Constitution addresses the issue of

  • (1) states’ rights
  • (2) separation of powers
  • (3) implied powers
  • (4) limits on governmental power